kitchen as a television revolution

kitchen as a television revolution

“When I was cooking from Julia’s cookbook, I had long imaginary conversations with her. It made me think that perhaps she would come to dinner, although I had never seen her.” Words by Nora Ephron, director and screenwriter Julie and Julia (2009), captures well the feelings of many American women who, in the 1960s/70s, were not only fascinated by books Mastering the art of French cuisineJulia Child (1912-2004), as they diligently followed the cooking show french chef, admiring the unique charm of his presentation. In this Efron film that weaves the story of an author/host and a New Yorker (Amy Adams) in a crisis of self-fulfillment, Meryl Streep gives us a glimpse of this woman’s picturesque side and her power of inspiration. , decades after appearing on television. The same presence now seen in JuliaHBO Max drama series detailing the famous cook and their role in a sexist society.

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